Business Overview

PRICE REDUCED!!!!

***NOW FULLY OCCUPIED – GENERATING OVER $25,000 PER MONTH***

This location has been established since 2019 and offers fully licensed and exceptional senior living care in a suburb of Oakland County providing a comfortable residential home setting.

Currently there are FOUR private and ONE semi-private rooms that offers accommodations for SIX residents.

This location does offer the possibility of utilizing the existing 3 car garage for adding additional bedrooms, or office space.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $529,999
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $2,500
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2020

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:2,775
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:4
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

Single home offering 2,775 square feet on over a half of an acre of land! Three car garage can be converted for a live-in caregiver.

Is Support & Training Included:

Seller will be available for training for 14 days at no additional cost to the buyer

Purpose For Selling:

Other Commitments

Pros and Cons:

There is a high demand for smaller home settings for senior care. Residents receive much better care at a smaller home than the big facilites.

Opportunities and Growth:

Expansion is possible with conforming the current 3 car garage to additional bedrooms, or office space.

Additional Info

The company was founded in 2020, making the business 2 years old.

The business has 4FT/6PT employees and is located in a building with disclosed square footage of 2,775 sq ft.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all sorts of reasons why people resolve to sell businesses. Nonetheless, the real factor and the one they tell you may be 2 absolutely different things. As an example, they might claim "I have too many other obligations" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. However, for some, these might simply be justifications to try to hide the reality of altering demographics, increased competitors, current decrease in earnings, or a variety of other reasons. This is why it is really crucial that you not rely completely on a vendor's word, but rather, utilize the seller's response along with your general due diligence. This will paint an extra reasonable picture of the business's present scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current business is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Many operating businesses borrow money in order to cover things like inventory, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Bear in mind that sometimes this can indicate that revenue margins are too small. Numerous companies come under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future obligations to take into consideration. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with suppliers that have to be satisfied or might cause charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do companies in the area bring in brand-new clients? Often times, companies have repeat customers, which create the core of their daily earnings. Specific elements such as brand-new competitors sprouting up around the location, road building, and also employee turnover can impact repeat clients and adversely influence future profits. One essential point to think about is the placement of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the highway? Certainly, the more people that see the business regularly, the better the possibility to build a returning consumer base. A last idea is the general area demographics. Is the business situated in a densely populated city, or is it situated on the outside border of town? Exactly how might the local average family income influence future revenue prospects?