Business Overview

DO NOT PASS UP THIS OPPORTUNITY! Less than an hour outside of Albany, NY lies the beautiful Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. This very manageable assisted living facility is a great opportunity for your entry into the long-term care business. This facility has a ton to offer. The facility has that feeling of “home” with large rooms, spacious activity/lounge rooms, home cooked meals in an attractive setting, an elevator and also some independent living.

Assisted living facilities are much different than nursing homes. There is no need for large nurse staffing or licensed administrators. Residents are ambulatory (get around with minor assistance) and there is no dealing with Medicare.

This home also features a home-health division that allows it to capture extra revenue and even has a few independent living rentals that go with this sale.

The property has been well maintained with a newer roof and flooring throughout. Management is in place so this is turn-key and awaiting your arrival.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $1,495,000
  • Cash Flow: $217,962
  • Gross Revenue: $638,261
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 1982

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:Yes
  • Building Square Footage:10,145
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:6
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

10,145 sq. ft. with off-street parking

Is Support & Training Included:

Seller supports transitional training

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Additional Info

The business was established in 1982, making the business 40 years old.

The company has 6 employees and is located in a building with estimated square footage of 10,145 sq ft.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons people choose to sell businesses. However, the genuine factor vs the one they tell you might be 2 totally different things. As an example, they may claim "I have a lot of other obligations" or "I am retiring". For many sellers, these factors are valid. But, for some, these may just be excuses to try to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, current decrease in incomes, or a variety of various other factors. This is why it is extremely crucial that you not depend totally on a seller's word, yet instead, utilize the seller's solution combined with your overall due diligence. This will paint a much more practical picture of the business's present scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current company is in debt, which lots of businesses are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous companies take out loans with the purpose of covering things like stock, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Bear in mind that in some cases this can mean that profit margins are too thin. Many companies fall into a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to think about. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that need to be satisfied or may lead to penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do operating businesses in the area draw in brand-new consumers? Most times, operating businesses have repeat clients, which develop the core of their everyday profits. Specific elements such as brand-new competition sprouting up around the area, roadway building, as well as staff turn over can impact repeat consumers as well as negatively influence future incomes. One essential point to consider is the placement of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping mall, or is it concealed from the highway? Clearly, the more people that see the business often, the higher the chance to construct a returning customer base. A last thought is the general location demographics. Is the business located in a largely inhabited city, or is it located on the outside border of town? Exactly how might the regional mean home income influence future income prospects?