Business Overview

This business has increased sales and decreased cost of goods sold in 2021. Owner has reinvested profits to purchase more state of the art production equipment as they prepare to scale up operations.This one if a kind business is a fast growing Home and Commercial Elevator company doing complete installations for existing or new construction homes. They also service all different brands of elevators in addition to manufacturing, milling and assembling their own hardware parts with new cutting edge technology machines.
The sky’s the limit for expansion in this hot home improvement field where many people wish to have a Home Elevator in their residences at a very reasonable price. Some analysts predict over 300% growth in this area and this company is prepared to dominate this section of growth.
All infrastructure including specialty milling equipment is in place along with a large fleet of trucks to support expansion.
5 years and growing this company has taken over the east coast in its field of expertise

Financial

  • Asking Price: $9,500,000
  • Cash Flow: $2,000,000
  • Gross Revenue: $7,100,000
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:28
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

2 weeks

Purpose For Selling:

retirement

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why people decide to sell businesses. Nonetheless, the real factor vs the one they say to you may be 2 completely different things. For instance, they may claim "I have a lot of other commitments" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these factors are valid. But also, for some, these might just be excuses to attempt to conceal the reality of transforming demographics, increased competitors, recent decrease in revenues, or a variety of other factors. This is why it is extremely essential that you not depend totally on a vendor's word, however instead, utilize the vendor's answer along with your general due diligence. This will paint a much more realistic picture of the business's current circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current entity is in debt, which many businesses are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Lots of companies take out loans in order to cover points like supplies, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Bear in mind that sometimes this can suggest that earnings margins are too thin. Many businesses fall under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may likewise be future obligations to consider. There may be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing agreements with vendors that must be satisfied or might result in charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do operating businesses in the location draw in brand-new clients? Often times, operating businesses have repeat consumers, which create the core of their day-to-day profits. Certain elements such as new competitors growing up around the location, road building and construction, and also staff turnover can impact repeat clients and also negatively impact future incomes. One essential thing to take into consideration is the placement of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the highway? Undoubtedly, the more individuals that see the business regularly, the greater the chance to build a returning customer base. A final thought is the general location demographics. Is the business placed in a largely populated city, or is it located on the outskirts of town? Exactly how might the local average household earnings effect future earnings prospects?