Business Overview

Seller is retiring. This family-owned Dairy Queen has been a staple in Iowa for over 40 years. Current owners are retiring and the new owners will take over a turnkey operation that’s clean, successful, and profitable! Most key equipment has been purchased/replaced within the last few years. Historical sales have been stable, 2020 revenue was up and 2021 revenue is up! Owner financing for an in-state OWNER Operator with 30% downpayment. No out of state absentee investors. This is a great business you could call your own. Will NOT last, great cashflow, fun to own, easy to manage.

Dairy Queen has been serving milkshakes, malts and frozen treats since 1940. With a menu that now includes burgers, hotdogs, chicken sandwiches and other tasty treats, the DQ brand is one of the most recognized in the world. As one of the very first food franchises, Dairy Queen has been perfecting the process for almost 70 years. Franchisees enjoy an affordable, high-quality product with strong profit margins.

The real estate can be purchased with the business or leased from the current owners. Due to the confidential nature of a business sale, the community location of the business will remain unadvertised. Contact Matt Ashburn today to find out how you can get into this fun to own, easy to operate, profitable Dairy Queen. Won’t last! Email Matthew at matta@sunbeltnetwork.com today!

Financial

  • Asking Price: $687,000
  • Cash Flow: $261,000
  • Gross Revenue: $854,450
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: Yes
  • Established: 1999

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:N/A
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

Available for lease or purchase

Is Support & Training Included:

Seller will provide training and transition. Franchise provides training and support.

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Established Franchise:

This Business Is An Established Franchise

Additional Info

The company was started in 1999, making the business 23 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons people decide to sell companies. Nonetheless, the real reason and the one they say to you might be 2 completely different things. As an example, they might claim "I have too many various obligations" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. But, for some, these might just be justifications to try to conceal the reality of transforming demographics, increased competitors, current decrease in earnings, or a range of other factors. This is why it is really vital that you not depend entirely on a vendor's word, yet instead, use the vendor's response in conjunction with your general due diligence. This will repaint an extra reasonable image of the business's present situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current business is in debt, which numerous companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Lots of companies take out loans in order to cover items such as inventory, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Remember that occasionally this can imply that profit margins are too tight. Lots of businesses fall into a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to consider. There may be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with vendors that need to be satisfied or may cause charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do businesses in the location bring in brand-new customers? Many times, companies have repeat consumers, which form the core of their daily revenues. Certain variables such as new competitors growing up around the location, road building and construction, as well as employee turnover can affect repeat customers and also adversely impact future revenues. One essential thing to take into consideration is the placement of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping center, or is it concealed from the main road? Undoubtedly, the more people that see the business often, the greater the chance to build a returning consumer base. A final thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business situated in a largely populated city, or is it located on the outskirts of town? Just how might the local typical family income impact future earnings prospects?