Business Overview

Established Commercial & Residential Cleaning Franchise. Operating 18 years the business has a formidable client base supported with a great complement of dedicated employees. Their base of operations occupies 1,000 square feet at $800 per month. And this centrally located office schedules and coordinates client services and dispatches employees. The Owner along with an Assistant and two Managers make up the office complement. Ten employees operate in the field. The operation provides exterior and interior window cleaning for storefronts, commercial buildings, and residential homes. Further, commercial and residential services include pressure washing, awnings and gutters. On the residential front, in addition to window cleaning services, the business also covers items like chandeliers, mirrors and skylight cleaning. These are just some of the services the business provides. The greater majority of their daily routine includes scheduled services for both commercial and residential clients. The business has a superior reputation and a growing client base. In fact, the business is in position to add technicians to satisfy the current growing need. Assets in the business include all of the tools of the trade as well as transportation vehicles. The owner will assure a smooth transition into the business providing training in addition to the required franchise assistance and training.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $259,500
  • Cash Flow: $104,458
  • Gross Revenue: $519,150
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $43,650
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2003

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:5
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

Will train for 2 weeks @ $0 cost.

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement.

Established Franchise:

This Business Is An Established Franchise

Additional Info

The business was started in 2003, making the business 19 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why people choose to sell operating businesses. Nevertheless, the true factor vs the one they tell you may be 2 totally different things. For instance, they might state "I have too many various responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons stand. But, for some, these might simply be justifications to try to hide the reality of altering demographics, increased competition, current decrease in earnings, or a range of other factors. This is why it is very essential that you not rely absolutely on a seller's word, yet instead, utilize the vendor's solution in conjunction with your overall due diligence. This will paint an extra practical picture of the business's existing situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current company is in debt, which many companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous operating businesses take out loans in order to cover things such as supplies, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Remember that in some cases this can imply that profit margins are too small. Many companies fall into a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back other loans. Along with debts, there may likewise be future commitments to think about. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business may have existing agreements with suppliers that need to be met or might result in charges if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do businesses in the area attract brand-new customers? Often times, companies have repeat customers, which form the core of their day-to-day profits. Certain variables such as brand-new competition growing up around the area, road building and construction, and also employee turn over can impact repeat clients as well as adversely affect future profits. One vital thing to take into consideration is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the main road? Undoubtedly, the more individuals that see the business regularly, the better the chance to construct a returning consumer base. A last idea is the general area demographics. Is the business located in a largely inhabited city, or is it situated on the edge of town? Just how might the neighborhood median family earnings influence future revenue prospects?