Business Overview

Per Franchisor regulations, Buyer needs to contact agent and complete non-disclosure agreement and personal financial statement prior to receiving sales and cash flow information. Little Caesars is one of the largest and fastest the growing pizza carry-out chains in the world with restaurants on five continents. Franchisor requires a minimum of 700 credit score, $250,000 net worth or 70% of purchase price, whichever is higher with $100,000 liquid cash or 20% of purchase price, whichever is higher. IRA and 401K not acceptable as liquid, only items that can be liquidated within 24 hours. Restaurant experience is preferred.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $80,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2004

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:15
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

All FF&E to be in good working condition prior to change over.

Is Support & Training Included:

Franchisor offer 8 weeks of training.

Purpose For Selling:

Other business interests

Pros and Cons:

Located near the water. Lots of boating summer traffic at this unit. Drive thru window.

Established Franchise:

This Business Is An Established Franchise

Additional Info

The venture was founded in 2004, making the business 18 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why people resolve to sell operating businesses. Nonetheless, the genuine factor vs the one they tell you may be 2 totally different things. For instance, they might say "I have a lot of various responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these factors stand. However, for some, these might simply be reasons to attempt to conceal the reality of changing demographics, increased competitors, recent decrease in profits, or a variety of other factors. This is why it is very vital that you not rely completely on a vendor's word, yet instead, make use of the vendor's answer together with your total due diligence. This will paint an extra reasonable image of the business's present circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current entity is in debt, which many businesses are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous operating businesses finance loans in order to cover points such as inventory, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Keep in mind that occasionally this can suggest that profit margins are too small. Lots of companies fall into a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future obligations to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with suppliers that have to be satisfied or might cause penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do companies in the area draw in brand-new clients? Many times, companies have repeat clients, which create the core of their everyday revenues. Certain aspects such as new competition growing up around the area, road building, and employee turn over can affect repeat customers as well as negatively impact future profits. One essential point to consider is the location of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping mall, or is it concealed from the main road? Clearly, the more people that see the business often, the greater the opportunity to develop a returning client base. A last thought is the general area demographics. Is the business placed in a densely populated city, or is it situated on the outskirts of town? Exactly how might the local median home earnings effect future revenue prospects?