Business Overview

For sale is a highly regarded 40 year-old commercial cleaning company in the booming Northern Virginia market. The business has highly satisfied customers, experienced and loyal employees, and tremendous growth potential.

All processes are in place for a new owner to come in and grow the business. This opportunity is especially well-suited for someone who wishes to expand their cleaning operation with a turn-key business.

ASKING PRICE: $475,000

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Revenue Accrual Basis
2021 — $900,345
2020 — $856,267
2019 — $1,074,126
2018 — $1,110,487

Seller’s Discretionary Earnings
2021 — $162,265
2020 — $73,371
2019 — $190,760
2018 — $222,074
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The company provides the following services to commercial entities:

• Regular ongoing contract cleaning including weekend work
• General cleaning tasks: vacuuming, sweeping and mopping, dusting, glass, restrooms
• Floor maintenance: stripping/scrubbing and waxing, buffing
• Small carpet cleaning jobs
• Set up services as requested
• Cleaning after special events (weddings, receptions, etc.)

Ideally Suited for A Buyer Who:

• Has a business outside the area and is looking to expand to the DC market
• Has another location in the DC market and wishes to expand its presence
• Wishes to add on to an existing commercial services business

The buyer should have business experience. Cleaning service experience is a plus.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $475,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: $900,345
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A
Purpose For Selling:

Owner wishes to retire

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons individuals resolve to sell businesses. Nevertheless, the genuine factor vs the one they tell you might be 2 entirely different things. For instance, they may state "I have too many other obligations" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these factors stand. However, for some, these might simply be justifications to attempt to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, current reduction in earnings, or an array of various other reasons. This is why it is extremely vital that you not count absolutely on a vendor's word, but instead, make use of the vendor's answer along with your general due diligence. This will repaint a much more realistic picture of the business's present scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which numerous companies are, then you will have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Lots of companies finance loans with the purpose of covering things like supplies, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Bear in mind that in some cases this can mean that earnings margins are too small. Lots of organisations fall into a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may likewise be future obligations to think about. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing agreements with vendors that need to be fulfilled or may cause charges if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do companies in the area attract new customers? Most times, operating businesses have repeat customers, which develop the core of their daily profits. Specific factors such as brand-new competitors growing up around the location, roadway construction, as well as staff turn over can influence repeat customers as well as adversely impact future revenues. One essential point to think about is the placement of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping center, or is it concealed from the main road? Clearly, the more people that see the business on a regular basis, the higher the opportunity to develop a returning consumer base. A final idea is the basic location demographics. Is the business situated in a densely populated city, or is it situated on the edge of town? How might the regional average family income effect future income prospects?