Business Overview

This medical device business is busy, growing, and profitable. Our vans bring mobile device services to you from our workshop-on-wheels. We help mobility-impaired veterans, seniors, injured and disabled persons retain their independence and quality of life by fixing their mobility equipment. This “essential business” is not just recession proof it is pandemic proof as well. This is a multiple revenue stream business including:
*Rent mobility equipment
*Sell mobility products and replacement parts for mobility equipment
*Sanitize and clean mobility equipment
*Repair mobility equipment
There are currently 11 national accounts in place which provide regular and predictable monthly revenues. This successful brand has been around for over 20 years. Cutting edge technologies and ongoing development make us the industry leaders. Working directly with the manufacturer means our business enjoys a significant cost advantage over the competition. We do not deal with the “middlemen” alleviating additional markups, making this is a very high net profit margin business with a very high-ticket average. Full training and ongoing support will be included with this business.
Contact Chris for detailed information about this business.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $199,000
  • Cash Flow: $127,900
  • Gross Revenue: $349,700
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2017

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:3
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

Contact for detailed information about this business.

Is Support & Training Included:

Full training and support will be included.

Pros and Cons:

Excellent name in the industry.

Opportunities and Growth:

Continually growing demand allows for long-term growth of this business.

Additional Info

The company was started in 2017, making the business 5 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons individuals choose to sell businesses. Nonetheless, the genuine factor and the one they say to you might be 2 absolutely different things. For instance, they might claim "I have too many various obligations" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons are valid. But also, for some, these may simply be excuses to try to conceal the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, current reduction in profits, or a range of other reasons. This is why it is very essential that you not depend absolutely on a vendor's word, yet instead, use the seller's response combined with your overall due diligence. This will repaint a much more reasonable image of the business's existing situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing company is in debt, which lots of businesses are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Many operating businesses finance loans so as to cover items like inventory, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Bear in mind that occasionally this can indicate that revenue margins are too tight. Lots of businesses fall under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may also be future obligations to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with suppliers that must be met or may result in charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do operating businesses in the location draw in new customers? Most times, operating businesses have repeat clients, which develop the core of their everyday earnings. Certain variables such as new competitors sprouting up around the area, roadway construction, as well as personnel turnover can affect repeat consumers and negatively influence future profits. One essential thing to think about is the placement of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the highway? Certainly, the more people that see the business often, the higher the possibility to build a returning client base. A final thought is the general area demographics. Is the business situated in a largely populated city, or is it located on the outskirts of town? Exactly how might the regional mean home earnings influence future revenue potential?