Business Overview

Confidentiality Non-Disclosure Required. This is a free-standing Restaurant in the Asian District located on Spring Mountain Rd. Established Turnkey Asian Restuarant for over 20 years. Complete with all Equipment and Furniture. 32-foot Exhaust Hood with Ansel System. 7 wok cooking stations, 2 steamer stations, 2 Deep Fat Fryer, Grill and 4 burner stove top and oven, 2 Stock pot Burners, Large upright Oven for Roasting and baking, 2 large Mixers, Walk In Refrigerator and Freezer, Ice Machine, Live Seafood tanks, etc. Newly remodeled front of the house. If Turnkey acquisition the Recipes, Plating Specs, of menu items and all marketing and advertising venues, business name, clientele list, 2 weeks training, included with Goodwill of the business.
Or you can purchase just the Assets only for $250,000.
Lease terms negotiable. Asking Lease rate is $4.00 base rent plus cam fee of approximately 48 cents. Tenant pays for all Utilities directly.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $450,000
  • Cash Flow: $100,000
  • Gross Revenue: $1,300,000
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $250,000
  • Inventory: $4,000
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2001

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:5,162
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:10
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

Turn Key Opportunity complete with all Equipment and Furniture. 32-foot Exhaust Hood with Ansel System. 7 wok cooking stations, 2 steamer stations, 2 Deep Fat Fryer, Grill and 4 burner stove top and oven, 2 Stock pot Burners, Large upright Oven for Roasting and baking, 2 large Mixers, Walk In Refrigerator and Freezer, Ice Machine, Live Seafood tanks etc. Newly remodeled Front of the house, Dining Room, Bar and Restrooms..

Is Support & Training Included:

2 weeks

Purpose For Selling:

Retiring

Pros and Cons:

Many Opportunities for the right Buyer

Opportunities and Growth:

Many Opportunities for the right Buyer

Additional Info

The venture was founded in 2001, making the business 21 years old.
The sale shall not include inventory valued at $4,000*, which ins't included in the requested price.

The company has 10 employees and is situated in a building with disclosed square footage of 5,162 sq ft.
The building is leased by the company for $4 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why individuals choose to sell operating businesses. However, the genuine reason and the one they say to you may be 2 absolutely different things. For instance, they might say "I have way too many various obligations" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons are valid. But also, for some, these may simply be excuses to try to conceal the reality of altering demographics, increased competition, recent reduction in earnings, or a range of various other reasons. This is why it is really vital that you not rely completely on a vendor's word, however rather, use the vendor's response in conjunction with your overall due diligence. This will paint an extra realistic picture of the business's current situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous companies finance loans so as to cover things like supplies, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Bear in mind that in some cases this can indicate that revenue margins are too thin. Lots of organisations fall under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back other loans. In addition to debts, there may additionally be future commitments to take into consideration. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business may have existing agreements with suppliers that should be fulfilled or might lead to fines if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do businesses in the area draw in new customers? Often times, businesses have repeat clients, which create the core of their day-to-day profits. Specific aspects such as new competition sprouting up around the location, roadway building, and personnel turn over can influence repeat consumers and also adversely affect future revenues. One essential thing to take into consideration is the placement of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the highway? Clearly, the more people that see the business regularly, the higher the chance to develop a returning consumer base. A final thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business located in a largely populated city, or is it located on the outside border of town? Just how might the neighborhood median family income effect future revenue prospects?