Business Overview

Unique opportunity to own and operate a true gem in North Georgia, this is a winning concept even during a pandemic. Seller is retiring and business is booming!

The current owners have lovingly operated and maintained this thriving business for the last 7 years and their hard work shows in the thousands of positive reviews online with almost 5 stars in Google, Yelp and other restaurants reviewing platforms.

With 2021 sales coming at over $2,328,124 with the owner profiting over $615,000 for a 5 night and one brunch only, over $2,755,00 in gross revenues for 2020 during the highs pandemic with more than $700,000 in profits. New owners can operate 7 days a week with lunches to see the revenues going over 3 million as the current owners grossed in 2018 and 2019.

The restaurant space (4,225 +/-) in and of itself is the most unique for the area which lends itself to being in a league of its own, being in historic building right in the busiest part of town, the seller gutted the space and renovated every aspect of it making it very modern and at the same time retaining its historical integrity, the restaurant seats 90 patrons with a state of the art long and social 30-stool bar facing 18 taps of mainly local and regional craft beer. Long term lease in place with a very favorable gross monthly rent of $5,600 per month.

Blue Ridge has always been a tourist favorite and now it is a hot spot for newcomers putting down roots, the entire North Gerogia region is surrounded by the majestic Blue Ridge Mountains. Whether it is a day spent at the beautiful lake, hiking, kayaking, food tours, breweries, or shopping. The region has something for everyone and that is what has made this town one of the best places to live in the south.

PROOF OF FUNDS AND SIGNED NDA MUST BE RECEIVED PRIOR TO DISCLOSING ANY FURTHER INFORMATION. THIS IS AN OPERATING BUSINESS; PLEASE REFRAIN FROM SPEAKING TO STAFF OR MANAGEMENT.

Attention Business Owners: We are always in search of quality businesses to sell, so if you are thinking of selling your business or would like to acquire another business, please call us to discover the difference that is.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $1,750,000
  • Cash Flow: $613,348
  • Gross Revenue: $2,328,124
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $300,000
  • Inventory: $5,000
  • Inventory Included: Yes
  • Established: 2014

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:4,225
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:24
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

The restaurant space (4,225 +/-) in and of itself is the most unique for the area which lends itself to being in a league of its own, being in historic building right in the busiest part of town, the seller gutted the space and renovated every aspect of it making it very modern and at the same time retaining its historical integrity. Long term lease in place with a very favorable gross monthly rent of $5,600 per month.

Is Support & Training Included:

2 weeks by the seller for a smooth transition.

Purpose For Selling:

Retiring

Opportunities and Growth:

Expanding hours and days available for additional sales, the business is currently dinner only 5 days a week and one brunch, opening 7 days and lunches should increase the sales drastically as the restaurant grossed over 3 million when they operated 7 days a week.

Additional Info

The company was started in 2014, making the business 8 years old.
The sale does include inventory valued at $5,000, which is included in the asking price.

The company has 24 employees and is situated in a building with disclosed square footage of 4,225 sq ft.
The real estate is leased by the business for $5,600 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons people decide to sell businesses. Nonetheless, the genuine factor and the one they say to you may be 2 completely different things. As an example, they might say "I have a lot of other commitments" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these factors are valid. But, for some, these might just be reasons to try to conceal the reality of altering demographics, increased competition, recent reduction in earnings, or a variety of various other factors. This is why it is extremely important that you not depend absolutely on a vendor's word, yet rather, make use of the seller's response together with your total due diligence. This will paint an extra realistic picture of the business's present scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Many companies borrow money in order to cover points such as supplies, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Keep in mind that in some cases this can mean that earnings margins are too tight. Many businesses come under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to consider. There may be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that should be fulfilled or may cause charges if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do businesses in the location attract new clients? Most times, operating businesses have repeat consumers, which form the core of their daily revenues. Certain aspects such as new competition growing up around the location, roadway building and construction, and employee turnover can influence repeat clients and negatively affect future incomes. One vital thing to take into consideration is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the main road? Certainly, the more people that see the business regularly, the higher the chance to construct a returning client base. A last idea is the basic area demographics. Is the business placed in a densely inhabited city, or is it situated on the edge of town? How might the neighborhood median house income influence future revenue prospects?