Business Overview

Full service garbage disposal service currently serving almost 500 residential and commercial customers in Northern NH and some areas of Maine and Vermont. Providing recycled and non-recycled pickups, in addition to roll off containers for household clean-outs and various construction materials with the exception of hazardous waste materials. Started in 1983, the company now consists of 5 trucks, garage, and six employees. Sale will include all trucks, compactors, 19 roll-off containers and approximately 250 rear end load dumpsters. Business just keeps increasing.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $1,299,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:Yes
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:N/A
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why people choose to sell operating businesses. Nonetheless, the genuine factor vs the one they tell you might be 2 absolutely different things. For instance, they may say "I have way too many various obligations" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these reasons are valid. However, for some, these might just be excuses to try to hide the reality of transforming demographics, increased competitors, current reduction in incomes, or an array of other factors. This is why it is very vital that you not depend totally on a seller's word, however rather, use the seller's solution in conjunction with your total due diligence. This will paint an extra practical image of the business's current situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing company is in debt, which many businesses are, then you will certainly need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous operating businesses finance loans in order to cover items such as inventory, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Remember that occasionally this can suggest that revenue margins are too tight. Many companies fall into a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing agreements with vendors that need to be fulfilled or might lead to charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do operating businesses in the location attract new consumers? Often times, businesses have repeat customers, which develop the core of their day-to-day revenues. Particular elements such as new competitors growing up around the location, roadway building and construction, as well as employee turnover can influence repeat customers and negatively affect future earnings. One crucial point to consider is the location of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the highway? Certainly, the more people that see the business regularly, the better the opportunity to build a returning customer base. A final thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business situated in a largely populated city, or is it located on the edge of town? How might the regional average household earnings effect future revenue potential?