Business Overview

HIGH VISIBILITY PRIME COMMERCIAL LOCATION, located on busy Route 3 (traffic count 2 million+), 340 ft of frontage, 2 curb cuts, ample parking, 7.1 acres bordering the Connecticut River and numerous outbuildings that make this a unique opportunity to run your own business, develop your master plan or recreate the Garden Center that has occupied this space for over 17 years. . Zoned Commercial, the real estate includes a renovated 1783 English post and beam barn that is currently being used as a retail center (handicap accessible). Out buildings on the property, and included in the price, are a 42 X 48 clear span grain shed, three 30 X 96 greenhouses, a 20 X 24 sand shed, eight 12 X 24 bins for aggregate and mulches, a 100 X 250 black top compost pad, 225 blueberry bushes and 200 raspberry bushes ideal for a “Pick You Own” venture plus several display areas. This long time, successful business is pregnant with opportunity and “GROWTH”, pardon the pun. However, if you are just looking for a site for your own existing business or some other new business, this site offers endless possibilities with its 7.1 flat and open acres. This is a rare opportunity to own an exciting commercial property. Allow your entrepreneurial spirit to soar in the quaint town of Lancaster, New Hampshire.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $649,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A
About The Facility:

Renovated 1783 English post and beam barn that is currently being used as the store (handicap accessible), full florist area with workspace and refrigerated display, a 42 X 48 clear span grain shed, three 30 X 96 greenhouses, a 20 X 24 sand shed, eight 12 X 24 bins for aggregate and mulches, a 100X 250 black top compost pad, 225 blueberry bushes and 200 raspberry bushes ideal for a "Pick You Own" venture plus several display areas.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all sorts of reasons individuals resolve to sell businesses. Nonetheless, the real reason vs the one they say to you might be 2 entirely different things. As an example, they may claim "I have a lot of other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these factors stand. But also, for some, these might just be justifications to attempt to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competitors, current decrease in incomes, or an array of various other reasons. This is why it is extremely crucial that you not depend entirely on a vendor's word, yet rather, use the seller's solution along with your total due diligence. This will paint a more realistic image of the business's current circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous operating businesses take out loans so as to cover items such as stock, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Remember that occasionally this can suggest that profit margins are too thin. Numerous businesses fall under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future obligations to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that need to be met or might cause charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do operating businesses in the location attract new customers? Many times, operating businesses have repeat consumers, which develop the core of their everyday profits. Certain elements such as brand-new competitors growing up around the location, road construction, and personnel turn over can influence repeat customers and adversely influence future earnings. One essential point to take into consideration is the area of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the highway? Clearly, the more individuals that see the business on a regular basis, the better the chance to build a returning client base. A last thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business placed in a largely inhabited city, or is it situated on the outskirts of town? Just how might the local median household income impact future income prospects?