Business Overview

Big Easy Campground (also called Circle 9) is a highly successful business with over 150 sites from tent camping to full service luxury RV sites. This property includes 22.65+- acres in central New Hampshire with excellent exposure on a busy thoroughfare but a quiet setting with all the amenities to make visitors enjoy a short or long term stay. Options include a tenting area, RV area, and mobil home sites. There are three modern bath houses in close proximity to any camp site, laundry facilities, a full service restaurant, inground pool, a recreation room, an onsite store, propane filling station, and a brand new 9,000+- square foot state of the art event hall. The event/banquet hall includes a full commercial kitchen and bar and an assembly permit for 298 people. Two ponds are available for great fishing. The three bedroom house offers on-site living or additional rental income for an owner/manager. Each site has electric, water and sewer. Financials information available upon request with signed Confidentiality Agreement.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $4,000,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 1970

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:Yes
  • Building Square Footage:10,000
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:N/A
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

See attached information packet. (Home Based)

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Home Based:

This Business Is Home Based

Additional Info

The company was founded in 1970, making the business 52 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why people choose to sell companies. However, the genuine factor and the one they tell you might be 2 totally different things. As an example, they may claim "I have too many other commitments" or "I am retiring". For many sellers, these reasons are valid. However, for some, these may simply be excuses to attempt to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, recent decrease in incomes, or a range of other factors. This is why it is extremely vital that you not rely absolutely on a seller's word, however rather, use the vendor's answer along with your overall due diligence. This will repaint an extra realistic image of the business's existing scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which numerous businesses are, then you will certainly need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Many companies finance loans in order to cover things such as supplies, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Bear in mind that in some cases this can indicate that revenue margins are too thin. Numerous companies fall into a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to think about. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the building where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with vendors that need to be fulfilled or may cause charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do operating businesses in the area draw in new clients? Most times, companies have repeat customers, which form the core of their everyday earnings. Specific aspects such as new competitors growing up around the location, roadway construction, and staff turnover can affect repeat customers and also adversely affect future profits. One vital thing to think about is the placement of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the main road? Undoubtedly, the more people that see the business on a regular basis, the higher the possibility to build a returning consumer base. A final idea is the basic location demographics. Is the business placed in a densely inhabited city, or is it located on the outside border of town? How might the regional mean family income influence future revenue prospects?