Business Overview

Exceptional durable siding & window company with $3.7 million revenue; $970K Discretionary Earnings; offered at $2.95 million is available for acquisition with SBA financing. The business is pre-approved for 15% down with SBA financing for qualified buyers.

The company sells and installs high-quality, energy efficient, and low maintenance residential siding, energy efficient replacement windows, and other energy efficient products.

The company is growing steadily. The owner-seller has built a company with excellent infrastructure, procedures, and a team of 19 employees including professional managers and experienced technicians. The company has great potential for faster growth depending upon buyer goals.

The owner’s attention to detail, expectation of quality workmanship, and emphasis on customer service have created a longstanding culture of professionalism that consistently delivers a quality of work and service that has driven its outstanding reputation.

Summary:
* Offered at $2.95 million + A/R and Inventory
* $3.7 million revenue 2021
* $969,780 Discretionary Earnings 2021
* $455,166 Down w/SBA Financing
* 19 employees
* 7 Service Vehicles
* $200,000 Inventory typical/average

Services:
* Siding and exterior wall product installation
* Window installation
* Product sales and distribution

Staff
* 19 employees
* Office Manager
* Production Manager
* Marketing Manager & Sales Team
* Highly Trained & Experienced Technicians

Equipment
* Trucks
* Cars
* Forklift & Trailer
* Office & Equipment

Buyer Skills and Requirements:
The owner is a licensed General Contractor (B license) and will act as the RMO (Responsible Managing Officer) for the buyer for up to 12 months (maximum allowed by SBA). The buyer will likely want to obtain their General Contractor license if not already held. The Seller will provide training for 4 weeks/40 hours per week and is available for consulting as negotiated after the initial training period.

Reason for Selling:
The owner is retiring.

Inquiries from principals only

Financial

  • Asking Price: $2,950,000
  • Cash Flow: $969,780
  • Gross Revenue: $3,700,000
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: $200,000
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2012

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:19
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

The owner is a licensed General Contractor (B license) and will act as the RMO (Responsible Managing Officer) for the buyer for up to 12 months (maximum allowed by SBA). The buyer will likely want to obtain their General Contractor license if not already held. The Seller will provide training for 4 weeks/40 hours per week and is available for consulting as negotiated after the initial training period.

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Additional Info

The business was established in 2012, making the business 10 years old.
The transaction shall not include inventory valued at $200,000*, which ins't included in the listing price.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why individuals choose to sell businesses. However, the real factor vs the one they say to you might be 2 totally different things. For instance, they may say "I have too many other obligations" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. However, for some, these may just be justifications to attempt to hide the reality of transforming demographics, increased competitors, recent decrease in incomes, or an array of various other factors. This is why it is really vital that you not count entirely on a seller's word, however rather, make use of the seller's answer in conjunction with your general due diligence. This will repaint a much more reasonable picture of the business's present circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing business is in debt, which many companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Lots of businesses borrow money in order to cover things like inventory, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Bear in mind that sometimes this can suggest that revenue margins are too tight. Lots of businesses fall into a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back other loans. Along with debts, there may likewise be future commitments to consider. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that have to be satisfied or might cause charges if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do operating businesses in the area bring in new clients? Many times, operating businesses have repeat consumers, which develop the core of their everyday earnings. Specific factors such as brand-new competitors growing up around the location, road building, as well as staff turnover can influence repeat customers and negatively affect future earnings. One essential point to take into consideration is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping mall, or is it concealed from the highway? Certainly, the more people that see the business on a regular basis, the better the possibility to develop a returning customer base. A last thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business located in a largely populated city, or is it located on the edge of town? How might the regional mean house earnings effect future revenue prospects?