Business Overview

This Sun Valley Congregate Living Facility sale including 6 bedroom facility’s property, as well as its Department of Human Services (DHS) License! The Type A Congregate Living Facility was established in 2014. The business has a Medical Director, a Registered Nurse (RN), 11 Licenses Vocational Nurses (LVNs) and 8 Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) and currently has 5 residents.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $1,650,000
  • Cash Flow: $194,665
  • Gross Revenue: $675,281
  • EBITDA: $194,665
  • FF&E: $25,000
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2014

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:Yes
  • Building Square Footage:2,610
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:20
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

This 2,610 square foot residence with 6 bedrooms is located on a 6,700 square foot lot. All of the business’s furniture, fixtures, equipment, as well as its property is included in the sale. Permits, license and contracts in place that should transfer in the sale include Department of Health Care Services (DHS) License, Providence and Saint Joseph’s Hospital contracts, Medi-Cal provider number as well as agreements in place.

Is Support & Training Included:

Seller will train for 4 weeks at 20 hours per week or as negotiated.

Purpose For Selling:

Personal

Pros and Cons:

With the influx of baby boomers and those with congregate living needs, this is a growing industry that remains somewhat protected from nascent competition due to its stringent licensing requirements.

Opportunities and Growth:

This is a relatively new business that is licensed for community living, with the real estate included in the sale. Inquire directly for details.

Additional Info

The venture was established in 2014, making the business 8 years old.

The company has 20 employees and is located in a building with estimated square footage of 2,610 sq ft.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all sorts of reasons why individuals choose to sell businesses. Nevertheless, the genuine reason and the one they tell you may be 2 entirely different things. For instance, they might say "I have too many other obligations" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these reasons stand. However, for some, these may simply be excuses to attempt to conceal the reality of transforming demographics, increased competition, recent decrease in profits, or an array of various other factors. This is why it is very vital that you not depend absolutely on a seller's word, yet instead, make use of the vendor's solution together with your total due diligence. This will paint a more realistic image of the business's present scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing company is in debt, which many companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous companies borrow money so as to cover items such as stock, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Bear in mind that sometimes this can suggest that earnings margins are too small. Numerous companies come under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with vendors that need to be met or may result in fines if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do companies in the area attract new consumers? Most times, operating businesses have repeat consumers, which develop the core of their day-to-day earnings. Particular aspects such as brand-new competitors growing up around the area, roadway building and construction, as well as personnel turnover can affect repeat consumers and also negatively influence future incomes. One crucial point to consider is the area of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the highway? Obviously, the more individuals that see the business on a regular basis, the greater the possibility to build a returning consumer base. A final thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business placed in a largely populated city, or is it located on the edge of town? How might the neighborhood average family earnings influence future revenue prospects?