Business Overview

Successful, long standing, Salida business is on the market for the first time in almost 50 years. High’s Liquor has been a Highway 50 Salida institution since it’s humble beginnings as Wayne’s Liquor in 1969. This business is ideally located at the east end of Salida on Highway 50 near the intersection of Hwy 291 and is the only liquor store on the east end of town. Lots of retail and storage space, Highway 50 frontage and easy in and out parking. There once was a drive through window that could be easily put back into service. The income potential for this business is off the hook. The business, Real Estate, and all business related equipment, fixtures and signage included in the $790k list price. Approximately $200k of inventory to be accurately tallied and paid for outright separately from Real Estate transaction at closing.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $790,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: $200,000
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:Own
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:2,482
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:N/A
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

This location has been operating as a successful liquor store since 1969.

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Pros and Cons:

Only liquor store located on the east end of Salida

Additional Info

The transaction doesn't include inventory valued at $200,000*, which ins't included in the listing price.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why people decide to sell operating businesses. Nonetheless, the genuine reason vs the one they say to you might be 2 absolutely different things. As an example, they may claim "I have too many various responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. But, for some, these might just be justifications to try to conceal the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, recent decrease in earnings, or a range of other reasons. This is why it is very crucial that you not depend totally on a vendor's word, but instead, make use of the seller's response combined with your general due diligence. This will repaint a much more practical image of the business's existing scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current company is in debt, which lots of businesses are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous companies finance loans so as to cover points like stock, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Bear in mind that in some cases this can suggest that revenue margins are too tight. Numerous businesses fall under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to think about. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with suppliers that need to be met or might lead to penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do companies in the area bring in brand-new consumers? Most times, operating businesses have repeat consumers, which create the core of their daily earnings. Certain variables such as new competition sprouting up around the area, roadway construction, and staff turn over can affect repeat customers and adversely affect future earnings. One crucial thing to take into consideration is the placement of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the highway? Obviously, the more individuals that see the business on a regular basis, the higher the possibility to build a returning customer base. A final idea is the general area demographics. Is the business located in a densely inhabited city, or is it located on the outside border of town? Just how might the local mean household earnings influence future earnings potential?