Business Overview

A consistent money maker, this company dominates its progressive niche in the Northern Colorado real estate brokerage market. Their unique consumer-based method produces steady cash flow for its owner year after year, making this company immune to the boom and bust cycles that plague traditional real estate firms. Systems have been developed and refined over the past 15 years to consistently deliver satisfied customers. There is not a better real estate brokerage company for sale in Colorado today or likely ever. The business is prequalified for an SBA loan. Full details will be shared only with serious, qualified buyers who agree to preserve complete confidentiality. Buyer must have a real estate broker’s license active for two years (in any state). The current owner is very motivated to sell and transition into a different venue for the final chapter of their career. But, they will certainly stay around as long as necessary to ensure that the new owner has all the training and transition assistance needed to succeed. Do not wait; contact us today if you want to buy a real estate company in Colorado. This is an awesome real estate brokerage business for sale.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $449,000
  • Cash Flow: $482,273
  • Gross Revenue: $593,542
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:2
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

As Negotiated

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why people decide to sell operating businesses. Nonetheless, the true factor and the one they say to you might be 2 totally different things. As an example, they might state "I have a lot of other obligations" or "I am retiring". For many sellers, these factors are valid. But, for some, these may just be justifications to attempt to hide the reality of altering demographics, increased competition, current reduction in profits, or a range of other reasons. This is why it is extremely crucial that you not depend completely on a seller's word, yet instead, make use of the seller's solution together with your general due diligence. This will paint a much more practical picture of the business's present circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current business is in debt, which numerous companies are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Numerous operating businesses take out loans so as to cover items such as inventory, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Keep in mind that in some cases this can mean that profit margins are too small. Lots of companies come under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may also be future commitments to take into consideration. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that should be met or may lead to penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do businesses in the area attract new customers? Most times, operating businesses have repeat customers, which develop the core of their everyday earnings. Specific variables such as new competition growing up around the area, road building and construction, and also personnel turn over can influence repeat consumers and negatively affect future incomes. One essential thing to think about is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping mall, or is it concealed from the main road? Obviously, the more people that see the business regularly, the greater the possibility to build a returning consumer base. A final thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business located in a largely inhabited city, or is it situated on the outskirts of town? How might the neighborhood average family income effect future revenue prospects?