Business Overview

This portfolio currently operates over a hundred ATMs in California. This portfolio has historical average net income of $72,000/mo. Due to COVID this portfolio has had terminals down but many have returned in 2021.

Over 100 of the machines are owned and operated by the seller and all of the equipment has been EMV upgraded. The machines are a mix of high end models with extended cassettes and a portion of which have Cencom locks and are operated by armor. Above 50% contract coverage.

This is an ideal mid-sized ATM portfolio with very strong numbers and a great regional presence with room to grow in the markets they serve. There are strong margins, niche markets, a full processing portfolio and newer equipment which is a huge asset for many larger buyers in the industry!

ATM Route Details

Asking Price- $3,000,000
Historical Net Income- $865,000
Additional rotating vault cash required to load machines weekly- Based on load
Number of Machines – Over 100 full service, all owned equipment, full processing route
Hours Required Weekly- Team of 2-3 can handle the entire route (with some armor)
Location Types- Convenience stores, restaurants, retail

Financial

  • Asking Price: $2,600,000
  • Cash Flow: $865,000
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $75,000
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2008

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:3
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

N/A

Is Support & Training Included:

As Needed

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Pros and Cons:

Substantial local presence and relationships.

Opportunities and Growth:

Great market and opportunity with many growth options.

Additional Info

The business was founded in 2008, making the business 14 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons people decide to sell operating businesses. Nevertheless, the true reason vs the one they say to you may be 2 absolutely different things. As an example, they may state "I have too many various commitments" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. But also, for some, these may simply be reasons to attempt to hide the reality of transforming demographics, increased competitors, recent reduction in earnings, or a range of various other factors. This is why it is extremely crucial that you not rely absolutely on a seller's word, however instead, utilize the vendor's solution together with your total due diligence. This will repaint a more sensible image of the business's current scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing company is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Lots of operating businesses finance loans in order to cover things such as supplies, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Bear in mind that in some cases this can imply that earnings margins are too small. Many companies fall under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future obligations to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing agreements with suppliers that must be satisfied or might result in fines if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do companies in the location draw in brand-new customers? Many times, operating businesses have repeat customers, which develop the core of their everyday revenues. Specific variables such as brand-new competitors growing up around the location, roadway building and construction, and employee turn over can affect repeat customers and adversely influence future incomes. One essential point to think about is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the highway? Clearly, the more people that see the business on a regular basis, the greater the opportunity to develop a returning client base. A last thought is the basic location demographics. Is the business situated in a densely inhabited city, or is it situated on the edge of town? Exactly how might the regional typical house income impact future income potential?