Business Overview

Have you dreamed of owning a business that gives the most life-enriching services to your friends, neighbors, and community? Well, here it is. Give the gift of music. There isn’t any other business like a music instruction business.

This locally owned Music Studio has been providing instruction for Piano, Strings, Woodwinds, Guitar, and Percussion/Drums for all ages and levels and experience. The Studio was started in 2000 out of the owner’s home, and as they grew, they moved into retail storefronts in a number of locations in Colorado Springs. They are currently operating out of one leased location.

It’s well established that musical training helps develop language and reasoning: Students who have early musical training will develop the areas of the brain related to language and reasoning. The left side of the brain is better developed with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds.

A mastery of memorization: Even when performing with sheet music, student musicians are constantly using their memory to perform. The skill of memorization can serve students well in education and beyond.

Students of all ages learn to improve their work: Learning music promotes craftsmanship, and students learn to want to create good work instead of mediocre work. This desire can be applied to all subjects of study.

Increased coordination: Students who practice with musical instruments can improve their hand-eye coordination. Just like playing sports, children can develop motor skills when playing music.

A sense of achievement: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be challenging, but an achievable goal. Students who master even the smallest goal in music will be able to feel proud of their achievements.

Success in society: Music is the fabric of our society, and music can shape abilities and character. Students in band or orchestra are less likely to abuse substances over their lifetime. Musical education can greatly contribute to children’s intellectual development as well.

Emotional development: Students of music can be more emotionally developed, with empathy towards other cultures They also tend to have higher self-esteem and are better at coping with anxiety.

Students learn pattern recognition: Children can develop their math and pattern-recognition skills with the help of musical education. Playing music offers repetition in a fun format.

Fine-tuned auditory skills: Musicians can better detect meaningful, information-bearing elements in sounds, like the emotional meaning in a baby’s cry. Students who practice music can have better auditory attention, and pick out predictable patterns from surrounding noise.

Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity: Introducing music in the early childhood years can help foster a positive attitude toward learning and curiosity. Artistic education develops the whole brain and develops a child’s imagination.

Music can be relaxing: Students can fight stress by learning to play music. Soothing music is especially helpful in helping kids relax.

Musical instruments can teach discipline: Kids who learn to play an instrument can learn a valuable lesson in discipline. They will have to set time aside to practice and rise to the challenge of learning with discipline to master playing their instrument.

Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can prepare students for the 21st-century workforce. The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow faster than others in the future.

Development in creative thinking: Kids who study the arts can learn to think creatively. This kind of education can help them solve problems by thinking outside the box and realizing that there may be more than one right answer.

Music can develop spatial intelligence: Students who study music can improve the development of spatial intelligence, which allows them to perceive the world accurately and form mental pictures. Spatial intelligence is helpful for advanced mathematics and more.

Responsible risk-taking: Performing a musical piece can bring fear and anxiety. Doing so teaches kids how to take risks and deal with fear, which will help them become successful and reach their potential.

Better self-confidence: With encouragement from teachers and parents, students playing a musical instrument can build pride and confidence. Musical education is also likely to develop better communication for students.

Yes, you can own your dream business and also help others realize their dream of playing beautiful music.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $130,000
  • Cash Flow: $49,000
  • Gross Revenue: $155,000
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $40,000
  • Inventory: $5,000
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2000

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:2,500
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:5
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

The music studio has multiple rooms with pianos and space for private or group instruction. The Music Studio has a "Jam Session" room, with video and audio recording capabilities.

Is Support & Training Included:

Seller will provide side-by-side training of the business operation, instruction methods, style, and techniques, for a smooth transition. The length of training will be determined by buyer and seller.

Purpose For Selling:

Retiring, moving out of state to be with family

Additional Info

The business was started in 2000, making the business 22 years old.
The transaction won't include inventory valued at $5,000*, which ins't included in the listing price.

The company has 5 employees and resides in a building with approx. square footage of 2,500 sq ft.
The property is leased by the company for $1,200 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all sorts of reasons people decide to sell businesses. Nevertheless, the real factor and the one they say to you might be 2 entirely different things. As an example, they may say "I have a lot of other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. However, for some, these might just be justifications to attempt to conceal the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, current reduction in earnings, or a range of other factors. This is why it is extremely crucial that you not rely totally on a seller's word, however instead, make use of the vendor's answer combined with your overall due diligence. This will repaint an extra reasonable picture of the business's existing circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current entity is in debt, which many companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Many businesses finance loans so as to cover things such as inventory, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Bear in mind that sometimes this can imply that earnings margins are too thin. Many businesses fall under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may additionally be future commitments to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with vendors that have to be met or might lead to fines if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do operating businesses in the area attract new customers? Often times, businesses have repeat clients, which create the core of their daily revenues. Specific elements such as new competitors sprouting up around the area, road building and construction, as well as staff turnover can influence repeat clients as well as adversely affect future revenues. One important point to consider is the placement of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping center, or is it concealed from the main road? Certainly, the more people that see the business regularly, the higher the possibility to build a returning client base. A last idea is the basic location demographics. Is the business located in a densely inhabited city, or is it located on the outside border of town? Exactly how might the neighborhood average home earnings impact future revenue prospects?