Business Overview

This store is a Mexican Quick Serve restaurant with 35 seats on the certificate of occupancy approximately 1800 square feet. Base Rent is $3,500 + real estate taxes and CAM is under 7,000 currently the store is branded under a multi-unit name very well known in Nassau County. The store is 100% absentee and currently 25% of the $15,000 per week they are grossing is in Uber Eats and DoorDash which is approximately 25% of sales. The current owner does not deliver I repeat this zero deliveries here and the numbers are 100% verifiable on the tax return. The owner is 100% absentee. This location needs an owner operator with an experienced owner the current owner will let the buyer operate under the current name for a small licensing fee or you can change this to any concept. Greek concept would be fantastic or a bagel store Deli would be fantastic or keep it Mexican. All Employees want to keep their job and owner will stay on for a smooth transition.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $199,000
  • Cash Flow: $109,900
  • Gross Revenue: $780,000
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

Seller willing to train new buyer

Purpose For Selling:

Other business interests

Additional Info

The real estate is leased by the business for $3,400 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why people choose to sell businesses. However, the real factor and the one they say to you might be 2 entirely different things. As an example, they may say "I have a lot of various obligations" or "I am retiring". For many sellers, these reasons are valid. But also, for some, these might simply be excuses to attempt to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competition, recent decrease in profits, or a range of various other reasons. This is why it is really vital that you not depend completely on a vendor's word, but instead, use the seller's response along with your general due diligence. This will repaint an extra sensible image of the business's existing situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current company is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will certainly need to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Many operating businesses take out loans with the purpose of covering points like inventory, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Bear in mind that sometimes this can suggest that earnings margins are too tight. Numerous companies fall into a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may additionally be future commitments to take into consideration. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing agreements with suppliers that must be satisfied or may lead to penalties if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do operating businesses in the area draw in brand-new consumers? Often times, businesses have repeat clients, which create the core of their day-to-day revenues. Certain elements such as brand-new competition growing up around the area, roadway building and construction, and staff turnover can impact repeat consumers and adversely influence future earnings. One essential point to consider is the placement of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the main road? Undoubtedly, the more people that see the business regularly, the greater the possibility to construct a returning customer base. A last idea is the basic area demographics. Is the business placed in a largely inhabited city, or is it situated on the outskirts of town? Just how might the regional average family income impact future income prospects?