Business Overview

Profitable, easy to run, and is located in a desirable upscale area. The market is growing specifically in its use for chronically painful spinal degenerative conditions. The physical studio space is one-of-kind with roll-up garage doors, modern décor, ceiling decal art and an overall upscale and inviting atmosphere, recently built out in 2008. The equipment is top of the line and maintained in excellent condition. The business has been kept at a small-scale by choice by the current owner due to her personally restricted schedule. A new owner could expand it easily by hiring additional staff and booking new business in the hours that are currently open in the studio weekly schedule like Tu/Th evenings and weekends. The space also features a 9×12 private room that can be used for physical therapy or massage therapy or leased out.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $125,000
  • Cash Flow: $57,755
  • Gross Revenue: $122,769
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $20,000
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: Yes
  • Established: 2008

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:900
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:1
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

2 weeks

Purpose For Selling:

Career change

Additional Info

The business was founded in 2008, making the business 14 years old.

The company has 1 employees and is located in a building with estimated square footage of 900 sq ft.
The property is leased by the business for $2,365 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why people choose to sell businesses. However, the true factor and the one they tell you might be 2 completely different things. As an example, they may state "I have way too many various responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these reasons are valid. But, for some, these might just be justifications to try to conceal the reality of transforming demographics, increased competition, current decrease in earnings, or a variety of various other reasons. This is why it is extremely important that you not depend entirely on a seller's word, however instead, make use of the vendor's answer along with your total due diligence. This will repaint a more practical image of the business's current situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing business is in debt, which lots of businesses are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Many companies take out loans so as to cover points like inventory, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Remember that in some cases this can imply that earnings margins are too thin. Numerous businesses come under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may additionally be future obligations to think about. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with suppliers that need to be satisfied or may lead to fines if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do companies in the location attract brand-new clients? Many times, companies have repeat consumers, which create the core of their everyday earnings. Specific aspects such as brand-new competition growing up around the location, road building and construction, as well as employee turnover can impact repeat customers as well as negatively impact future profits. One vital point to take into consideration is the location of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the main road? Clearly, the more individuals that see the business often, the better the possibility to develop a returning customer base. A final thought is the basic location demographics. Is the business located in a densely populated city, or is it situated on the edge of town? Just how might the local median household earnings effect future income prospects?