Business Overview

Unique opportunity to own a highly profitable, well-established full-service auto repair business located in Prime Location on Major Cross Streets in the East Valley. Family-Owned and Operated, fully licensed, and insured, this shop offers a full range of automotive repairs on autos, RVs, and large trucks. It has 5 service bays with lifts, (4 inside 1 covered outside bay is supersized to accommodate large RV’s & trucks) plus addl. covered area if needed plenty of parking. Top line equipment, highly trained ASE certified technicians with10 yr. exp this shop. All repeat customers & their referrals, no Advt. New owner should add website & social media. Good books. Owner primarily handles diagnostics, customer interface, estimates, job assignments, invoicing, relays technicians findings. The operation is turn-key start work earning money tomorrow from the loyal customer base who have posted great reviews and testimonials on Google and Yelp. The owner is looking to retire and will provide a smooth and staged transition to help a new owner seamlessly step into a well-run operation and lead the team to its next phase..

Financial

  • Asking Price: $300,000
  • Cash Flow: $173,056
  • Gross Revenue: $604,373
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $60,000
  • Inventory: $1,000
  • Inventory Included: Yes
  • Established: 1990

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:2
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

30 days plus phone consulting

Purpose For Selling:

Retirement

Additional Info

The company was established in 1990, making the business 32 years old.
The sale shall include inventory valued at $1,000, which is included in the listing price.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons individuals resolve to sell companies. Nonetheless, the true factor vs the one they say to you may be 2 entirely different things. As an example, they may claim "I have a lot of other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors stand. But also, for some, these may simply be justifications to try to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competitors, recent reduction in earnings, or an array of other reasons. This is why it is really crucial that you not depend completely on a vendor's word, however instead, make use of the vendor's solution combined with your total due diligence. This will repaint an extra reasonable picture of the business's existing circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current business is in debt, which many companies are, then you will certainly need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Many operating businesses take out loans in order to cover things such as stock, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Remember that sometimes this can indicate that profit margins are too thin. Many organisations fall into a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may likewise be future commitments to think about. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business may have existing contracts with vendors that have to be fulfilled or might lead to penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do businesses in the area bring in new consumers? Most times, businesses have repeat customers, which form the core of their everyday profits. Certain elements such as new competitors sprouting up around the area, road building and construction, and also employee turnover can affect repeat consumers as well as negatively affect future earnings. One important thing to consider is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the main road? Certainly, the more individuals that see the business on a regular basis, the greater the opportunity to develop a returning customer base. A last thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business placed in a densely inhabited city, or is it located on the outside border of town? How might the local average household income impact future income potential?