Business Overview

This Established Trophy and Screen-Printing Shop has been in business since 1975 and has been proudly serving the Hancock County Area and Northwest Ohio for (46 Years) !! The present owners have owned the business since 2003 and are now ready to retire. The business has a great reputation and has established Long standing relationships with area schools, businesses, and the community which generates a large volume of repeat business.

The shop can customize a unique award, trophy, medal or plaque to suit any corporate recognition, educational achievement or sports accomplishment. They offer the following services:

Trophies and Awards:

They offer a complete line of Trophies. Figures are available for just about any sport or activity. Trophy bases are available in a variety of shapes with single or multiple columns in a variety of colors to meet your specific needs. Available base finishes are walnut, white, white marble, and black marble.

Engraving:

They offer the latest technology in laser engraving giving a professional look to plaques, acrylics, wood and marble. With the versatility of the laser they can create a very special look for awards using the clients logo and a wide variety of type styles.

Silk Screen-Printing:

They offer quality custom shirts, sweatshirts, hats and more. Their graphic artist can help create a unique design or work with a clients existing design or art work.

Embroidery:

They offer custom embroidery on shirts, hats, and jackets giving your company or organization a unique touch of class.

The owner works in the business (Monday-Friday Closed on Weekends) putting in approximately a 40 hour work week. The business has one Part-Time employee that works 25-30 hours per week and is paid $15.50 per hour.

The business has Very Limited competition in the Hancock County Area and is the go to place for the surrounding Schools, Churches, and businesses in the area.

Historical Summary:
2018 Sales: $294,083 Owner Profit: $84,944
2019 Sales: $295,088 Owner Profit: $104,058
2020 Sales: $186,859 Owner Profit: $64,808 Down Due to COVID

2021 YTD September Sales: 182,575 2021 YTD September Owner Profit: $68,096

STRONG Consistent Business ! Backed with a GREAT Reputation ! Consistent Sales and Profits !

Financial

  • Asking Price: $79,900
  • Cash Flow: $64,808
  • Gross Revenue: $186,859
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: $4,000
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 1975

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:2,712
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:1
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

The business is located in a strip center which is adjacent to a Very Busy Big box tenant. The Total Monthly Rent is $2,165 with the Lease Expiring June 30, 2022. There is a Five (5) Year Option to Renew the Lease in place that will extend the term to June 2027. Additional years can be obtained to extend the term further.

Is Support & Training Included:

Seller will provide training to ensure a smooth transition to a new owner.

Purpose For Selling:

Owner Retirement.

Pros and Cons:

The business has Very Limited competition in the Hancock County Area and is the go to place for the surrounding Schools, Churches, and businesses in the area.

Additional Info

The business was founded in 1975, making the business 47 years old.
The deal doesn't include inventory valued at $4,000*, which ins't included in the listing price.

The company has 1 FT 1 PT employees and is located in a building with estimated square footage of 2,712 sq ft.
The property is leased by the business for $2,165 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why people resolve to sell operating businesses. However, the true reason and the one they say to you may be 2 absolutely different things. As an example, they might claim "I have a lot of other obligations" or "I am retiring". For many sellers, these reasons stand. But, for some, these might simply be reasons to try to hide the reality of transforming demographics, increased competition, current reduction in revenues, or a range of other reasons. This is why it is very essential that you not depend entirely on a seller's word, yet instead, make use of the vendor's response in conjunction with your general due diligence. This will repaint a more reasonable picture of the business's present scenario.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing company is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Many companies take out loans so as to cover items like supplies, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Keep in mind that occasionally this can mean that profit margins are too small. Numerous organisations fall under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to consider. There might be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that must be satisfied or might result in penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do businesses in the area draw in brand-new consumers? Most times, companies have repeat consumers, which develop the core of their everyday revenues. Specific elements such as new competitors sprouting up around the location, roadway construction, and also employee turn over can influence repeat clients as well as negatively influence future revenues. One important thing to consider is the location of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the main road? Clearly, the more individuals that see the business on a regular basis, the better the possibility to construct a returning client base. A final thought is the general area demographics. Is the business located in a largely populated city, or is it located on the outside border of town? How might the regional typical family earnings impact future income prospects?