Business Overview

This nearly 20-year-old same-day delivery, freight, courier and hot shot service has been serving customers based in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana with a great track record of success. The owners are ready to rewire themselves as their families age, leading to the desire to sell the business they started, have grown and love. All the equipment needed to maintain the business and grow its presence in the Midwest comes with the purchase. A buyer could put themselves in the driver’s seat, literally and figuratively, or contract the driving as the business grows.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $350,000
  • Cash Flow: $209,518
  • Gross Revenue: $271,595
  • EBITDA: $99,477
  • FF&E: $187,000
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2001

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:2
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
About The Facility:

N/A (Home Based)

Is Support & Training Included:

Owners are willing to train. And they will provide transition timeline.

Purpose For Selling:

Owners to retire.

Pros and Cons:

In the logistics business, speed is essential – and this firm has thrived by responding to customers quickly and delivering on all their promises. No request is too big or too small with this firm. With a variety of trailer and truck sizes, the firm’s hot shot services are best-in-class in the region.

Opportunities and Growth:

With a strong brand name and a rebounding economy, this business can provide a healthy return on investment and tremendous opportunity for an investor or an owner/operator.

Home Based:

This Business Is Home Based

Additional Info

The business was established in 2001, making the business 21 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons why individuals decide to sell companies. Nonetheless, the genuine factor vs the one they tell you might be 2 completely different things. For instance, they might state "I have too many other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons stand. But, for some, these might just be reasons to attempt to conceal the reality of transforming demographics, increased competitors, recent decrease in incomes, or a variety of various other reasons. This is why it is really important that you not depend entirely on a seller's word, however rather, make use of the vendor's solution along with your overall due diligence. This will repaint a more reasonable picture of the business's current situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing company is in debt, which lots of businesses are, then you will have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous companies take out loans so as to cover items like supplies, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Remember that in some cases this can mean that profit margins are too small. Numerous companies fall into a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may additionally be future obligations to take into consideration. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the structure where the business resides. The business might have existing agreements with vendors that must be satisfied or may lead to charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do operating businesses in the area bring in brand-new clients? Many times, businesses have repeat customers, which form the core of their day-to-day revenues. Certain factors such as brand-new competition sprouting up around the location, roadway building and construction, and also personnel turnover can impact repeat clients and also adversely affect future revenues. One essential point to think about is the placement of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the highway? Clearly, the more people that see the business often, the better the opportunity to construct a returning consumer base. A final thought is the basic area demographics. Is the business located in a densely inhabited city, or is it situated on the outside border of town? Just how might the neighborhood mean house earnings influence future revenue potential?