Business Overview

For decades this business has led the way for BBQ taste and quality. Beloved by loyal customers locally and previously enjoyed through a vibrant retail presence. This business withstood the test of COVID, Fires, Ice Storms and Economic upheaval. With a bustling retail business, catering, food cart and food truck, this company is positioned to grab new market share locally, regionally and through retail, nationally.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $600,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:6
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A

Additional Info

The company has 6 employees and resides in a building with approx. square footage of N/A sq ft.
The building is leased by the business for $0.00

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why individuals choose to sell businesses. Nevertheless, the genuine factor vs the one they tell you might be 2 absolutely different things. For instance, they might say "I have way too many various obligations" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these factors are valid. But, for some, these might just be reasons to try to hide the reality of altering demographics, increased competition, current reduction in earnings, or a range of other reasons. This is why it is really essential that you not depend entirely on a seller's word, however rather, use the vendor's solution combined with your general due diligence. This will paint a much more realistic image of the business's present circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current entity is in debt, which many companies are, then you will certainly have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous companies take out loans with the purpose of covering points like inventory, payroll, accounts payable, etc. Bear in mind that in some cases this can imply that profit margins are too thin. Many companies come under a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to take into consideration. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the structure where the business resides. The business may have existing agreements with suppliers that should be met or may cause penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do businesses in the area draw in new clients? Most times, businesses have repeat clients, which form the core of their everyday revenues. Particular factors such as new competitors growing up around the area, roadway building, as well as staff turnover can affect repeat consumers and also negatively affect future earnings. One essential point to consider is the area of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping center, or is it concealed from the highway? Obviously, the more people that see the business on a regular basis, the better the chance to develop a returning consumer base. A final thought is the general location demographics. Is the business situated in a densely populated city, or is it situated on the outside border of town? How might the neighborhood median house earnings effect future earnings potential?