Business Overview

Incredibly successful 29 year old training/consulting firm, that generates over $8000 dollars per billable day, is looking to sell. The company’s programs, which specialize in leadership development and customer service training, provide an exceptionally powerful, yet fun and interactive experience resulting in very high repeat customer business.

With its unique IP including books, audio, and video, along with an impeccable reputation, the company is well positioned and ready to scale quickly.

See attached file for additional information.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $1,200,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: $405,000
  • FF&E: N/A
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 1991

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:2
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

Intensive Master Trainer Certificate, Leadership Certificate, Exceeding Customer Expectations Certificate.

Purpose For Selling:

Spend more time with family and caring for parents.

Pros and Cons:

This company operates in an extremely defensible niche market with high repeat business. Content is transferrable across all markets.

Opportunities and Growth:

The company operates in the management consulting space, which accounts for 85% of the $265B US industry. The company’s unique IP and standardized material allow for excellent scalability.

Additional Info

The company was established in 1991, making the business 31 years old.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons people choose to sell companies. Nevertheless, the real reason vs the one they say to you might be 2 entirely different things. As an example, they may claim "I have way too many other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons are valid. However, for some, these might simply be reasons to try to hide the reality of altering demographics, increased competitors, recent decrease in earnings, or a variety of various other factors. This is why it is really crucial that you not count entirely on a seller's word, however instead, utilize the vendor's solution along with your total due diligence. This will paint a more sensible picture of the business's current circumstance.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will certainly need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Many businesses finance loans with the purpose of covering items such as supplies, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Remember that occasionally this can mean that earnings margins are too tight. Numerous organisations come under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future commitments to take into consideration. There might be an outstanding lease on tools or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with suppliers that must be satisfied or may lead to fines if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do companies in the area bring in brand-new clients? Often times, companies have repeat consumers, which form the core of their day-to-day revenues. Particular factors such as new competitors sprouting up around the area, road construction, and also staff turnover can influence repeat consumers as well as negatively impact future revenues. One vital thing to think about is the area of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping mall, or is it hidden from the highway? Certainly, the more people that see the business on a regular basis, the better the possibility to construct a returning client base. A final idea is the general area demographics. Is the business situated in a largely inhabited city, or is it located on the outskirts of town? Just how might the regional typical family earnings effect future income prospects?