Business Overview

Profitable Full-Service Glass Company Located in Albany County, NY. Provides a great opportunity for a glass and mirror company that is looking to expand their service area and operations. This business specializes in Residential and Commercial Glass and Window Replacement, as well as Storm and Screen Repair, Shower Doors and Enclosers, Patio Doors and Bow Window Replacements, Auto Glass Repair and Replacement, Custom Stained Glass and Repairs.

Proudly serving the capital city area they have stood by their customer commitment to service “All Your Glass Needs” for over 40 years. This business is headquartered in a 4,000 Sq Ft facility that features a showroom, warehouse and workshop supporting customizations and professional installations. Open 6 Days a week. This company was established in 1969 and benefits from an excellent reputation for high quality work, generating repeat business.

This business is priced to sell with a highly motivated owner. Seller will provide hands-on training to ensure a smooth transition.

For more information, please contact: msussman@inbargroup.com

• Asking Price: $495,000
• FF&E: $95,000 (included in price)
• Annual Cash Flow: $275,000
• Gross Revenue: $1,258,000
• Inventory: $60,000
• Employees: 5 FT
• Monthly Rent: $2,500
• Security Deposit: $5,000
• Payroll: $285,000
• Down Payment: Negotiable
• Open: 6 Days a week
• Building Size: 4,000 Sq Ft.
• Established: 1969

Reason for Selling: Owner is seeking retirement.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $495,000
  • Cash Flow: $275,000
  • Gross Revenue: $1,258,000
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $95,000
  • Inventory: $60,000
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 1969

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:N/A
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:5
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

Seller will provide support and hands-on training to ensure a smooth transition.

Purpose For Selling:

Owner is seeking retirement.

Opportunities and Growth:

There is plenty of room for growth and expansion.

Additional Info

The company was established in 1969, making the business 53 years old.
The sale doesn't include inventory valued at $60,000*, which ins't included in the asking price.

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all sorts of reasons individuals resolve to sell operating businesses. Nonetheless, the real factor and the one they tell you might be 2 absolutely different things. As an example, they may claim "I have a lot of other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For lots of sellers, these factors are valid. However, for some, these may simply be excuses to try to conceal the reality of transforming demographics, increased competition, recent decrease in revenues, or a range of various other factors. This is why it is extremely vital that you not depend totally on a vendor's word, however instead, utilize the vendor's solution along with your overall due diligence. This will paint a much more practical picture of the business's current situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current company is in debt, which lots of companies are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Numerous operating businesses borrow money so as to cover items like stock, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Bear in mind that occasionally this can indicate that profit margins are too thin. Many companies fall under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. Along with debts, there may also be future obligations to think about. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing contracts with vendors that must be fulfilled or may result in penalties if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Just how do operating businesses in the area draw in new consumers? Often times, businesses have repeat customers, which form the core of their day-to-day profits. Certain aspects such as brand-new competitors growing up around the area, roadway building, as well as staff turnover can influence repeat clients and also adversely affect future incomes. One crucial thing to take into consideration is the area of the business. Is it in an extremely trafficked shopping mall, or is it concealed from the highway? Certainly, the more people that see the business regularly, the higher the possibility to develop a returning consumer base. A final thought is the basic location demographics. Is the business located in a densely populated city, or is it located on the outside border of town? How might the neighborhood typical household earnings influence future income potential?