Business Overview

Top Franchise Kumon Math & Learning Center.
Excellent Franchise with Strong Franchisor Support.

This business is ideal for individuals with a passion for education and helping kids. For kids from pre-K to high school, this business is a math and reading academic enrichment program that goes well beyond traditional tutoring, unlocking the potential of children to achieve more.

Lender (SBA) pre-approved for qualified buyer

“New Kumon owners must meet the minimum qualifications required to be a Franchisee.”

Seller opened brand new Kumon in 2017.
Profitable since the opening and has been growing every year, including during the pandemic.
With a concentrated effort in advertising, networking to schools, churches, community center, can provide a substantial opportunity for an owner-operator to take the business to the next level.
The current owner is operating semi-absentee leaving a substantial opportunity for an owner-operator to take the business to the next level.
The growth in the area has brought lots of diverse first-generation immigrant population where many students come to the center for help with English because the parents can’t help.

Within 5 miles, there are five elementary schools that can bring additional revenue with a little advertising. Additionally, recently a daycare opened its door in the exact center.

Large busy Shopping Center next to a Supermarket and fine retail outlets.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $250,000
  • Cash Flow: $119,488
  • Gross Revenue: $266,956
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $1,000
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: 2017

Detailed Information

  • Property Owned or Leased:N/A
  • Property Included:N/A
  • Building Square Footage:1,750
  • Lot Size:N/A
  • Total Number of Employees:11
  • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment:N/A
Is Support & Training Included:

4 weeks

Purpose For Selling:

other interests

Additional Info

The company was established in 2017, making the business 5 years old.

The business has 11 employees and is located in a building with estimated square footage of 1,750 sq ft.
The building is leased by the company for $3,674.58 per Month

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all kinds of reasons people decide to sell operating businesses. However, the genuine factor and the one they tell you may be 2 absolutely different things. As an example, they may say "I have a lot of other responsibilities" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons stand. However, for some, these might just be excuses to attempt to hide the reality of transforming demographics, increased competition, recent decrease in earnings, or an array of other reasons. This is why it is very essential that you not count absolutely on a seller's word, but instead, utilize the seller's solution along with your total due diligence. This will repaint an extra realistic picture of the business's present situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the current business is in debt, which many businesses are, then you will have reason to consider this when valuating/preparing your deal. Numerous companies take out loans in order to cover things like supplies, payroll, accounts payable, and so on. Keep in mind that sometimes this can imply that earnings margins are too thin. Lots of organisations fall into a revolving door of taking on debt as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may likewise be future commitments to take into consideration. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the structure where the business resides. The business might have existing agreements with vendors that must be satisfied or might cause charges if canceled early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

How do companies in the location attract brand-new clients? Many times, operating businesses have repeat customers, which create the core of their daily profits. Particular aspects such as brand-new competitors growing up around the area, road building and construction, as well as employee turnover can impact repeat consumers as well as negatively influence future profits. One essential point to take into consideration is the location of the business. Is it in a highly trafficked shopping center, or is it concealed from the highway? Clearly, the more people that see the business often, the higher the possibility to construct a returning consumer base. A last idea is the general area demographics. Is the business placed in a densely populated city, or is it located on the edge of town? Just how might the regional mean house earnings effect future earnings prospects?