Business Overview

The hyperbaric chamber is a 2015 large, multi-place model that fits up to 5 people. The equipment includes medical gas line hookups, compressor setup, alarm and monitor panels, and many other improvements.

Other assets include the strong brand, custom-built website, an email database of 2.7K addresses, social media sites with great engagement, written operating and patient policies, and more.

For additional information on this rare opportunity, please contact William Bruce at 251-990-5934 or email him from this site.

Financial

  • Asking Price: $189,000
  • Cash Flow: N/A
  • Gross Revenue: N/A
  • EBITDA: N/A
  • FF&E: $215,000
  • Inventory: N/A
  • Inventory Included: N/A
  • Established: N/A

Additional Info

The property is leased by the company for $0.00

Why is the Current Owner Selling The Business?

There are all types of reasons why individuals decide to sell companies. Nonetheless, the true reason and the one they say to you may be 2 completely different things. As an example, they might state "I have a lot of various obligations" or "I am retiring". For numerous sellers, these reasons stand. However, for some, these might just be excuses to try to hide the reality of changing demographics, increased competitors, current reduction in profits, or a range of various other reasons. This is why it is extremely important that you not count absolutely on a seller's word, yet instead, utilize the seller's solution in conjunction with your general due diligence. This will repaint a much more realistic picture of the business's present situation.

Existing Debts and Future Obligations

If the existing entity is in debt, which numerous businesses are, then you will need to consider this when valuating/preparing your offer. Lots of operating businesses take out loans with the purpose of covering points such as stock, payroll, accounts payable, so on and so forth. Remember that sometimes this can indicate that earnings margins are too thin. Numerous businesses fall under a revolving door of taking loans as a way to pay back various other loans. In addition to debts, there may also be future obligations to think about. There may be an outstanding lease on equipment or the building where the business resides. The business might have existing agreements with suppliers that must be met or may cause penalties if terminated early.

Understanding the Customer Base, Competition and Area Demographics

Exactly how do companies in the location bring in new customers? Most times, companies have repeat consumers, which create the core of their daily profits. Certain factors such as brand-new competition sprouting up around the area, road building and construction, and personnel turnover can affect repeat customers and negatively impact future revenues. One vital point to take into consideration is the area of the business. Is it in a very trafficked shopping center, or is it hidden from the main road? Undoubtedly, the more people that see the business often, the greater the possibility to develop a returning client base. A last idea is the general area demographics. Is the business located in a largely inhabited city, or is it situated on the outskirts of town? Exactly how might the neighborhood typical family income impact future income potential?